Your Cart

Scientists have mapped the DNA of tea – and it could stave off a pending crisis

Posted by Julian Gottlieb on


Chungui Lu, Nottingham Trent University The world’s most popular drink (after water) is under threat. We already know much about the threat of climate change to staple crops such as wheat, maize and rice, but the impact on tea is just coming into focus. Early research indicates that tea grown in some parts of Asia could see yields decline by up to 55% thanks to drought or excessive heat, and the quality of the tea is also falling. The intensive use of pesticides and chemical fertilisers in tea plantations has also led to soil degradation at an average annual rate of 2.8%. This also causes chemical runoff into waterways, which can lead to serious problems for human health and the...

read entire article

Green tea may prevent urinary incontinence

Posted by Julian Gottlieb on


Fron Jackson-Webb, The Conversation Drinking green tea may help alleviate urinary incontinence in middle-aged and older women. The Curtin University research team examined the effects of green tea consumption in a cohort of Japanese women aged between 40 and 75. While urinary incontinence was a problem for 28 per cent of participants, those who drank four or more cups of green tea daily were significantly less likely to suffer from the condition. Fron Jackson-Webb, Section Editor, The Conversation This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

read entire article

Health Check: five reasons to put the kettle on and have a cup of tea

Posted by Julian Gottlieb on


Clare Collins, University of Newcastle Growing up, tea drinking was reserved for my grandmother’s visits. Making it followed a strict and fascinating ritual. Take scalding hot water. Warm the tea pot. Add one spoon of tea leaves for each person and one for the pot. Cover with a tea cosy. Turn the pot three times to the left, three to the right, then three to the left. Leave to brew. Warm the cups; milk in first, pour through a tea strainer. Two-thirds of over-70s are tea drinkers. Louise Lj/FLickr, CC BY-NC My grandmother could taste any attempt you made to shortcut the process. Once Grandma approved the tea, pressure eased and conversation flowed. In Australia 38% of the general population...

read entire article

Does drinking hot tea in summer really cool you down?

Posted by Julian Gottlieb on


Steve Faulkner, Loughborough University and Katy Griggs, Loughborough University I remember as a child, on the rare warm days that we used to get in Britain, my grandmother telling me to “have a cup of black tea … it will help cool you down”. As a seven-year-old, this seemed like a crazy idea, especially when all I wanted was a cold lemonade and another ice cream. But it appears that this old wives’ tale may actually be more Stephen Hawking than Stephen King. The idea of drinking hot drinks in warm weather goes back hundreds of years. Tea, or “chai” is one of the most popular drinks in India, and many of the leading consumers of tea per capita are...

read entire article